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What Will Happen To Your Guns When You Die?

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Article first appeared on Ammoland.com

United States – -(AmmoLand.com)- It is never easy to confront one’s own mortality, but Second Amendment supporters – including loyal Ammoland readers – have a big reason to think about what will take place after they’re gone via one simple question: What will happen to your guns?

Since, alas, we can’t take our firearms with us when we pass along, it behooves a gun owner to figure things out before they leave this mortal coil. Your firearms should be part of your estate planning. If you don’t decide what to do with your firearms, then either a court or the executor of your estate will be making those decisions – and they may not make the same decisions you would have made. So, part of the responsibility that comes with exercising your Second Amendment rights is making a plan for your firearms once you’re gone.

A look at The Blue Book of Gun Values can explain why: If you had a Mossberg 500 ATL Tactical ($540), a Rock River Arms LAR-15 CAR A2 ($875), an older Winchester Model 190 ($175), a Glock 17 Gen4 ($550), a Taurus PT-58 ($360), and a Smith and Wesson Model 19-3 ($725), you’re looking at over $3,000 in value for the guns alone – never mind the ammo, accessories, and the safe (or other security measures) that would presumably go along with the firearms. That’s a fair chunk of cash.

Ideally, you’ll be able to pass them down to your children to continue traditions of gun ownership and support for the Second Amendment. However, if you don’t have children, if the children you have are prohibited under federal or state law from possessing firearms, or if they lack interest in owning firearms, you’ll need to have some sort of backup plan.

One option could be to arrange for a consignment sale through your local FFL, with the money being split evenly among your heirs, or via an auction site, like GunAuction.com. You also could leave them to extended family members who would properly appreciate them. Gifting them to friends could also be an option.

Of course, it goes without saying that one would also want to find a way to continue defending the Second Amendment after one passes on. If you wish, you could auction off your guns for a posthumous donation to any number of pro-Second Amendment organizations. Another option is to plan to donate part of your estate to those same groups. Many of them will be able to help you make those plans for your estate.

Of course, to ensure there will still be firearms to pass down to future generations, Second Amendment supporters should join the NRA, and support the NRA’s Institute for Legislative Action and Political Victory Fund to ensure that the current anti-Second Amendment regimes in the House, Senate, and White House and at the state level are defeated at the ballot box as soon as possible.


About Harold Hutchison

Writer Harold Hutchison has more than a dozen years of experience covering military affairs, international events, U.S. politics and Second Amendment issues. Harold was consulting senior editor at Soldier of Fortune magazine and is the author of the novel Strike Group Reagan. He has also written for the Daily Caller, National Review, Patriot Post, Strategypage.com, and other national websites.

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